Board Chair: Russ Senti  

I have been involved with caring for creation from a very young age helping my Dad out with the family farm in upstate NY from 1963 - 1975. Most recently, as Executive Director of the Lutheran Outdoor Ministries Center (LOMC) in Illinois, I am responsible for not only caring for LOMC's 640 acres that God has entrusted me with but to educate other leaders in the ELCA on how they can be better stewards of what God has given them. My real passion is helping youth discover their role in caring for creation.

 




Board Secretary: Pat Almonrode 
 
I’m a progressive attorney spending most of my time ensuring that workers who’ve been taken advantage of by their employers receive fair compensation. I also have extensive experience as an organizer, having played a leading role in organizing NYC protests against the Keystone XL Pipeline, and in organizing the faith community’s participation in the 2014 People’s Climate March in NYC and the 2016 March for a Clean Energy Revolution in Philadelphia. I’m a longtime member of Saint Peter’s Lutheran Church in Manhattan, the Metro NY Synod’s Environmental Stewardship Committee, and 350NYC, a local affiliate of 350.org, the worldwide grassroots organization fighting climate change. I try very hard to take seriously the commitment we make in the offertory prayer to “dedicate our lives to the care and redemption of all that You have made.”

Board Treasurer: Jim Davidson
Jim has worked for both regional and national public accounting firms and was certified by the Massachusetts Board of Accountancy in April of 1989. Jim has also worked in the private sector as an Accounting Manager and as a Controller. With over thirty years of experience he brings a wealth of knowledge to LRC. His first LRC event was in 2011 at a New England Synod green team event. As a member of House of Prayer Lutheran Church in Hingham, MA his leadership has always incorporated the sacred needs of the earth when President of the church council. His spiritual connection to the natural world is also mirrored in his mentorship of confirmation classes at Calumet Lutheran Ministries every summer.  





Diane Brehmer:  Through my firm Catena Investment Strategies, I am an independent consultant to individuals and organizations, specializing in conventional and sustainable, responsible, impact investing. I am also a founding member of Micro-Advocates Cooperative, a member-owned organization that provides support, education, and connections for micro-business owners – those who own a business of less than ten, and usually only one, employee. I have eighteen years’ experience in investment management for the ELCA’s investment subsidiary, and hold an MBA in Finance from the University of Chicago. I am a member (and the Treasurer) at Pilgrim Lutheran in St. Paul Minnesota.

 

Ruth M.  Ivory-Moore:

Ruth is ELCA’s Program Director for Environment and Energy.  She has had careers in chemical engineering, as a corporate legal counsel, and brings legal specialties including environmental law and climate change. She is married to Chuck Moore.  They have two children and two grandchildren.  She enjoys travelling; spending time with family and friends; and  particularly planning large family gatherings. She continues to beinvolved with Christian education leadership in her church.    Her other volunteer work includes chairing a young adult and youth leadership summit in southern Virginia.   She is a member of the board of Creation Justice Ministries and a member of ACT Alliance’s Climate Change Group.  She has given speeches or various environmental and climate change subjects.



Mary Minette: Mary has been engaged with LRC throughout its formation. Mary was director of environmental education and advocacy for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Washington Office from March 2006 to January 2016. During that time, she served as the North American representative to the Climate Change Advisory Group of the ACT Alliance, a global network of faith-based relief and development organizations; as president of the board of Creation Justice Ministries, formerly the National Council of Churches eco-justice program; and on the executive committee of the National Farm Worker Ministry board. Prior to joining the ELCA, Mary worked for a number of secular environmental organizations, serving as vice president of the Earth Day Network, legislative director for the League of Conservation Voters, and staff attorney with the National Audubon Society's endangered species program and its trade and environment program. She holds a bachelor of arts degree in English literature from Stanford University and a juris doctor degree from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law. She is a member of the bar in California and the District of Columbia. Mary is currently at Mercy Investment Services as director of shareholder advocacy.

Rev. Mark Peters: Mark was the Executive Director for the Lutheran Coalition for Public Policy in Minnesota (LCPPM) from 1995-2013. Mark's advocacy and education efforts at LCPPM focused on the passage of mercury reduction, renewable energy, local control, children's environmental health (biomonitoring and health tracking - often referred to as tracking toxins) and Global Warming. A significant part of this work has been to establish and provide faith-based resources to congregation creation care teams in faith communities.  Mark also manages his family farm in Wisconsin that has recently been awarded the Wildlife Habitat Stewardship Award for Richland County, Wisconsin for conservation practices and is a lifelong hunter and fisherman.

 


Rev. Kwame Pitts: “Being involved with LRC renews my commitment to the caring of Creation and also gives me the opportunity to be immersed in current issues that are impacting both urban and rural areas and to be that voice, and bring these public issues theologically to the Seminaries as well to the laity.” While Pitts earned her M.Div. from Lutheran School of theology at Chicago she co-founded Seminarians for Justice, a student social justice group dedicated to utilizing our academics towards practical theology with involvement with the community outside its walls. Pitts also worked for several summers at Lutheran Outdoor Ministries in Illinois. She joined 35 faith leaders at a workshop in June 2016 at Union Seminary in New York on the science of climate change, resistance to fossil fuel infrastructure, environmental justice, and climate communication, including training from former Vice President Al Gore. You can read her work via her blog: and see her interviewed as part of the video series, EarthBound.[PM1] 

 

Rev. Dr. Barbara R. Rossing: As professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, she loves to teach and preach about the Bible, including the Bible’s role in public life. An avid environmentalist, Rossing is involved with environmental initiatives at the seminary. She served as pastor of a congregation in Minnesota, director for Global Mission Interpretation for the American Lutheran Church, pastor at Holden Village Retreat Center, Chelan, Wash., and chaplain at Harvard University Divinity School. Rossing has lectured and preached widely, including synod assemblies and global mission events for the ELCA, as well as ecumenical theological conferences. She has served on the executive committee and council of the Lutheran World Federation (2003-2010), and chaired the Lutheran World Federation's theology and studies committee. As a public theologian her media appearances have included “CBS Sixty Minutes” as well as The History Channel, National Geographic, Living the Questions, and numerous print and radio interviews.

Louis Tillman recently finished a yearlong internship at Redeemer Lutheran Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is expecting to earn his Master of Divinity from Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago in May 2017. As part of the GreenFaith Emerging Leaders Multi-faith Climate Convergence in 2015 he went to Rome as one of 100 young leaders, ages 21-40, selected from around the world. He says, “I have had the honor of being in Rome among 100 amazing and incredible climate activists from every corner of the world. We all came from different faiths but we breathe the same air, we share the same trees and we live on the same earth…The multicultural and enriching discussions exploring the deeply connected faith teachings we all have showed me that our common cause of protecting our environment transcends borders, cultures, religions, race and background and means we are truly one family of God's creation on earth appointed to protect all the things we love. Now let's start changing the world, one person at a time,” Tillman says.