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Advisory Board


Alycia Ashburn She grew up in a tiny prairie town in southwestern Minnesota, where she fell in love with nature and learned the importance of community engagement and public service. Alycia has made a career out of her greatest passion: empowering and equipping people of faith to be strong advocates for environmental stewardship and policy. She was instrumental in getting LRC off the ground and facilitated the first several Train-the-Trainer workshops throughout the country. Much of her time now is spent trying to usher her nature-loving toddler daughter into a better world. She also works to make the future brighter through her role with Ohio Interfaith Power & Light as an outreach coordinator and as a board member for the Center for Spirituality in Nature.


With more than twenty years of experience in stewardship ministry, Keith A. Mundy currently serves as Assistant Director for Stewardship Ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.  For more than ten years, Keith has served ELCA congregations and synods by engaging leaders in the formation of healthy and missional congregations.  This ministry has included earthkeeping and caring for creation as part of a holistic understanding of being a steward. In his own words, “I think of myself as a servant of Christ with a passion for God’s creation and growing faithful stewards.  As we continue our faith walk, we become more aware of how God is calling us to act justly and walk humbly with God in caring for creation.”   


 Richard J. Perry, Jr., professor of church and society and urban ministry, has been on the faculty of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago since 1996. After his ordination in 1977, Perry served Calvary Evangelical Lutheran Church, Gary, Ind., for three years. His experience in urban and multi-cultural ministries was honed as director of inclusive ministries for the North Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, and as director for Black ministries for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). In 1999, he co-chaired the International Planning Committee for the Conference of International Black Lutherans held in Wittenberg, Germany, where he presented the paper "Justification and Racial Justice." He was also a presenter at the first consultation between African and African-American Lutheran Theologians in Harare, Zimbabwe; and chaired the working group on racism in the church and society at the Lutheran World Federation's Seventh Assembly in Budapest, Hungary.












David Rhoads, professor of New Testament, joined the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago faculty in 1988. He previously was professor of religion at Carthage College, Kenosha, Wis., where he was named teacher of the year for 1973-74. He has written numerous articles, and is the author of Mark as Story and The Challenge of Diversity, two well-known texts. In 2004, he published Reading Mark, Engaging the Gospel. In 2005, he published From Every People and Nation: The Book of Revelation in Intercultural Perspective, a book that brings together many voices reading the Book of Revelation from their place and mining its meaning for different social locations. In 2007, he edited a collection of sermons from well-known environmentalists in the faith community, Earth and Word: Classic Sermons on Saving the Planet. He is a passionate advocate for eco-justice and environmental ministry, and coordinates both the environmental ministry emphasis and the biblical studies emphasis. He is married to the Rev. Sandra Roberts. They live in Racine, Wisconsin, where they raise two grandchildren.

 


H. Paul Santmire has been a leader in the field of ecological theology for more than forty years. Ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ELCA), he is the author of The Travail of Nature: The Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology (1985), Nature Reborn: The Ecological and Cosmic Promise of Christian Theology (2000), and Ritualizing Nature: Renewing Christian Liturgy in a Time of Crisis (2008), all from Fortress Press. Paul has been a critical founder of this global movement and is eager to hand the baton to the next generation of organizers.



Kim Winchell Deacon*, ELCA:

I am a life-long Lutheran and have been involved in a variety of ELCA efforts to promote the care of creation since the early 1990's. Back then, my professional work was as a Medical Technologist [B.S. Univ. of Michigan, 1976], and I worked in a hospital laboratory for 24 yrs.

But my increasing passion for, and work in, faith-based environmental advocacy and organizing efforts [conferences, workshops, climate change work] ultimately drew me into what was (then) the diaconal ministry roster of the ELCA. I remember having a feeling akin to Jeremiah’s “fire in my bones,” and that “earthkeeping ministry” was something I just had to do. I earned my M.A. in Pastoral Ministry in 2004, and was called and consecrated as a Diaconal Minister for Earthkeeping Education & Advocacy in 2005, for the N/W Lower MI Synod of the ELCA. I served in that role, within my synod and beyond, from 2005-2013.

Though I am currently on leave from call, I was fortunate to have been a voting member at the ELCA 2016 Churchwide Assembly. In that capacity, I participated in moving forward a resolution to call for the choice of fossil-fuel-free investment options in ELCA investments and pensions. Over the years I have also written several reflections, articles, and the small group study guide, Awakening to God’s Call to Earthkeeping (2007). I have felt so very blessed to be able to share my passion for tending and mending creation with others, especially through the work of Lutherans Restoring Creation, as we all work together to more faithfully answer God's call to earth-keeping. 

*By action taken at the 2016 CWA, the ELCA has changed the name of the lay and diaconal rosters to now be termed “Deacons” and “Ministers of Word and Service.”

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