The Sacrament of the Altar

What is the Sacrament of the Altar?

It is the true body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ under the bread and wine, instituted by Christ himself for us Christians to eat and to drink.

Where is this written?

The holy evangelists Matthew, Mark, and Luke, and St. Paul write thus:

“In the night in which he was betrayed, our Lord Jesus took bread, and gave thanks; he broke it, and gave it to his disciples, saying:  Take and eat; this is my body, given for you.  Do this for the remembrance of me.  Again, after supper, he took the cup, gave thanks, and gave it for all to drink, saying:  This cup is the new covenant in my blood, shed for you and for all people for the forgiveness of sins.  Do this for the remembrance of me.”

            Think!  One of the last things Jesus did, before being arrested in a garden and condemned to death, was to share a meal.  In various stories, one of the first things Jesus did, after rising from the dead in a garden, was to share meals.  What does it mean that Jesus shares this meal with you?  How do you feel about Jesus being present in something so common as a bit of bread, of God embodied in the earthly elements of our world?

            Act!  Visit ELCA World Hunger resources webpage for a toolkit on “Hunger and Climate Change Connections” that has activities and resources for a guided conversation on what climate change means for world hunger.  Find this and other ways you can help the ELCA share food and address changing resources by searching www.ELCA.org for “hunger and climate.”

 

What is the benefit of such eating and drinking?

The words “given for you” and “shed for you for the forgiveness of sins” show us that forgiveness of sin, life, and salvation are given to us in the sacrament through these words, because where there is forgiveness of sin, there is also life and salvation.

How can bodily eating and drinking do such great things?

Eating and drinking certainly do not do it, but the words that are recorded:  “given for you” and “shed for you for the forgiveness of sin.”  These words, when accompanied by the physical eating and drinking, are the essential thing in the sacrament, and whoever believes these very words has what they declare and state, namely, “forgiveness of sin.”

            Think!  In regular daily meals, God is present to sustain your life.  In communion with so much of creation, with the willingness of sunshine and miracle of photosynthesis, of farmers and pollinators and yeast, by soil and in a vessel God’s salvation is again made present for you.  How does their part in bringing you the sacrament bring you to care for them?

            Act!  The physical eating and drinking is clearly a worthwhile and necessary part of God’s blessing and work.  Choose ingredients and bake bread for communion.  Visit a winery.  “Taste and see that the Lord is good!”  (Psalm 34:8)

 

Whothenreceives this sacrament worthily?

Fasting and bodily preparation are in fact a fine external discipline, but a person who has faith in these words, “given for you” and “shed for you for the forgiveness of sin,” is really worthy and well prepared.  However, a person who does not believe these words or doubts them is unworthy and unprepared, because the words “for you” require truly believing hearts.

            Think!  In this way of looking at the Small Catechism, or in your life generally, what have been actions and behaviors that have been very important for you in saving the earth?  How do you feel about the statement that individual actions are “significant but not sufficient” for the problem at hand?  What more needs to be done that you cannot do alone?

            Act!  Always give thanks to God for this abiding grace in Christ, continuing to give to you and everything else.  As Psalm 145:15-16 says, “The eyes of all wait upon you, O Lord, and you give them their food in due season.  You open your hand and satisfy the desire of every living creature.”  With this in mind, say a prayer before each meal.  Luther suggests, “Lord God, heavenly Father, bless us and these your gifts, which we receive from your bountiful goodness, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”