The Lord's Prayer

Our Father in heaven.

What is this?

With these words God wants to attract us, so that we come to believe that he is truly our Father and we are truly his children, in order that we may ask him boldly and with complete confidence,

as loving children ask their loving father.

            Think!  Calling God a Father “in heaven” was to clarify we weren’t talking to a birth parent.  It is not trying to say God is “in some heaven light years away.”  How is God even more nurturing and trustworthy like a loving parent if God is “Here in this Place” (ELW Hymn #532), still walking amid the garden (Genesis 3:8)?

            Act!  Since our minds are on the heavens with this prayer, don’t let it get too ethereal!  Go outside and notice the clouds or the stars.  Feel the sunlight.  Watch the phase of the moon.  Pause in this prayer to look up from life’s busy paths.


Hallowed be your name.

What is this?

It is true that God's name is holy in itself, but we ask in this prayer that it may also become holy in and among us.

How does this come about?

Whenever the word of God is taught clearly and purely and we, as God’s children, also live holy lives according to it. To this end help us, dear Father in heaven! However, whoever teaches and lives otherwise than the Word of God teaches, dishonors the name of God among us. Preserve us from this, heavenly Father!

            Think!  Asking that God make us holy, we often think about it as more pious, more focused on the supernatural.  How do you think God would define holy living amid creation?  (You might see the prophets for help—Isaiah 5:8, 11:6-9, 24:3-6; Hosea 2:18-19, 4:3; Amos 5:8-12; Micah 4:4, 6:8)

            Act!  Adopt a new way of holy living by finding at least one new way to be mindful about conserving resources:  Shut off lights.  Recycle.  Use less water.  Pay attention to your actions as a spiritual discipline.

 

Your kingdom come.

What is this?

In fact, God’s kingdom comes on its own without our prayer, but we ask in this prayer that it may also come to us.

How does this come about?

Whenever our heavenly Father gives us his Holy Spirit, so that through the Holy Spirit’s grace we believe God’s holy word and live godly lives here in time and hereafter in eternity.

            Think!  Notice again that the kingdom is not equated to heaven, but comes in how we live here and now.  Read Mark 4:30-32, where Jesus compares God’s kingdom to a mustard shrub in which we all rest.  Where do you experience the nesting comfort of God’s promise? 

            Act!  Since the parable talks of birds and plants, find and identify one around you.  Know this amazing diversity of who your nest-mates are.

 

Your will be done, on earth as in heaven.

What is this?

In fact, God’s good and gracious will come about without our prayer, but we ask in this prayer that it may also come about in and among us.

How does this come about?

Whenever God breaks and hinders every evil scheme and will—as are present in the will of the devil, the world, and our flesh—that would not allow us to hallow God's name and would prevent the coming of his kingdom, and instead whenever God strengthens us and keeps us steadfast in his word and in faith until the end of our lives. This is God’s good and gracious will.

            Think!  The prayer continues reinforcing that this is a matter for this life—for this earth!  If flowers bloom to the glory of God, gurgling rapids sing God’s praises, and even rocks do what they’re supposed to do, how can you listen for God’s will for you to love all your creaturely neighbors on earth?

            Act!  Luther says God breaks us from the world, here not meaning the natural world but the things that get in the way of focusing on what God wants.  Make a list of at least 5 ways your actions or lifestyle get in the way of God’s good for the natural world.  Then list at least 5 things of this world you’d like to pay better attention to.  Finally, list at least 5 things to change for the culture of your church, community, or country. 

 

Give us this day our daily bread.

What is this?

In fact, God gives daily bread without our prayers, even to all evil people, but we ask in this prayer that God cause us to recognize what our daily bread is and to receive it with thanksgiving.

What then does “daily bread” mean?

Everything included in the necessity and nourishment for our bodies, such as food, drink, clothing, shoes, house, farm, fields, livestock, money, property, an upright spouse, upright children, upright members of the household, upright and faithful rulers, good government, good weather, peace, health, decency, honor, good friends, faithful neighbors, and the like.

            Think!  Luther here already admits the ecological expanse of our daily sustenance.  Where did your last meal come from and what did it take to produce it?  How much can you trace about the full origins of your food?

            Act!  Go one day per week without eating meat.  If all Americans did it, it would be the same as taking one of every eight (8 million) cars off the road!  Help spread what our resources can sustain.

 

Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.

What is this?

We ask in this prayer that our heavenly Father would not regard our sins nor deny these petitions on their account, for we are worthy of nothing for which we ask, nor have we earned it.  Instead we ask that God would give us all things by grace, for we daily sin much and indeed deserve only punishment. So, on the other hand, we, too, truly want to forgive heartily and to do good gladly to those who sin against us.

            Think!  How do we balance pardoning and holding accountable environmental sins?  Will seals forgive us our oil spills?  Will ancient redwoods and Amazon rainforests forgive air pollution and deforestation?  Will stream life and coral reefs forgive us for mountain top removal and burning coal?  Will people of island nations forgive us for the flooding of their homes?

            Act!  As atonement for our corporate sins, plant a tree, ride a bike or find another way to atone for and mitigate the destruction humans cause.  And know that God is eagerly helping you!

 

Save us from the time of trial.  (Lead us not into temptation.)

What is this?

It is true that God tempts no one, but we ask in this prayer that God would preserve and keep us, so that the devil, the world, and our flesh may not deceive us or mislead us into false belief, despair, and other great and shameful sins, and that, although we may be attacked by them, we may finally prevail and gain the victory.

            Think!  An average child watches 20,000 commercials on TV each year.  This corporate consumer myth of brand identity and purchasing ease and inexpensive happiness is much of what got us into our current ecological crisis.  How can you help a child to enjoy life in a natural state?

            Act!  Don’t forget to get outside yourself!  Shut off the TV or computer at some point this week and go for a walk, or sit and enjoy.

 

And deliver us from evil.  (For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and forever.  Amen.)

What is this?

We ask in this prayer, as in a summary, that our Father in heaven may deliver us from all kinds of evil—affecting body or soul, property or reputation—and at last, when our final hour comes, may grant us a blessed end and take us by grace from this valley of tears to himself in heaven.

            Think!  In Luther’s summary, this perhaps also points to the close of the prayer—and the start—that we are in God’s care forever and ever.  Even in this time of trial where we may fear irreversible harm, God is with us.  “Yes, it is going to come about just like this!”  How does God’s ongoing work for good in this world empower you and give you hope?

            Act!  Pray for God’s work to save the whole earth.  And pray that you also will love what God loves and save what God saves.  Yes it shall be so!